For Christmas delivery, please
order by December 14th.

Meet the widows who went from being stone breakers to businesswomen with the help of the Rafiki Foundation.


Refugees

In 1986, several South Sudanese women and their children were displaced as a result of a war which ravaged the country and created lasting instability. After much struggle, they arrived at a refugee camp in Kiryandongo in western Uganda, where life proved to be difficult and resources scarce. Not losing hope, they focused on God's promises while praying for a brighter future. By God’s grace, the women found safety in Kampala, Uganda, but still struggled to provide for themselves and their children.

The only work they could find was breaking stones at quarries for construction work.

A Life of Hardship

They received very little pay for their work in the quarries. A week of working from morning until evening earned them less that 1.50 US dollars. As the women made friends in the community, they received training in making paper bead products as another source of income. However, they sadly fell victim to the exploitation of unethical buyers and continued struggling to make enough money on which to live and pay for their children’s education.

Biblical Fellowship
and Hope

After years of surviving on very little without hope for a better life, the Sudanese refugee women met Margaret Ajju, a trained biblical counselor. Margaret began a Bible study for the refugees and other women in the community.

Though encouraged and engaged, the group soon faced the same challenge that impacts many African Christians—a lack of Bibles. Very few of these women owned their own Bibles and those they had were old and tattered. Through God’s gracious provision, Margaret obtained more Bibles for the group. To this day, the women continue to meet regularly to study God’s Word as they eagerly embrace the richness of God’s promises.


African Businesswomen

Praying for an opportunity to make a reliable income selling their handcrafts, the refugee women showed Margaret their paper bead products. When Margaret met Rafiki missionary Patti Lafage and introduced her to the women, Patti was impressed with their artisan crafts and wished to help them. They began selling their crafts to Rafiki and their lives changed radically:  

—They no longer need to break stones to earn meager living.
—They can now afford more than one meal a day, medical care, and other needed resources.
—They have the funds to send their children to school.
—They added Rafiki Bible Study lessons to their group study and rejoice in all they are learning about their heavenly Father and his gracious provision.

God answered their prayers and provided the budding businesswomen with a brighter future through the Rafiki Foundation.

These are the kind of women Rafiki partners with and this is the impact each and every purchase has! Rafiki is blessed to know these women and we praise the Lord that he connected us with them.